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frame necessary to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. it's wednesday, december 12th, and this is "now." >>> joining me today, msnbc contributor and political editor and white house correspondent for the "huffington post," sam stein holding it down stag style. jane mayer from "the new yorker" is here. bbc world news america anchor and former traveling press secretary for the obama campaign jen socky. this is the speed of the fiscal cliff negotiations. blink and you just might miss exactly nothing. while talks between speaker boehner and president obama over the past three days have been shrouded in secrecy, we've learned there have been two offers put on the table. the white house sent boehner a proposal on monday calling for $1.4 trillion in tax revenue, $200 billion less than the original offer. might that seal the deal? >> the president's called for $1.4 trillion worth of revenue. that cannot pass the house or the senate. >> okay then. the speaker's office responded with a deal of its own. yesterday it included precisely the same amount of revenue from the original proposal, $800 bi
for the programs that are important for millions of americans to continue, they have to be part of the fiscal cliff deal because it's unlikely that house republicans would allow these to appear freestanding. using these as leverage in terms of negotiation. house republicans could sleep fine knowing the payroll tax cut is not extended and the ui is not extended. they think that's too much spending. >> which is crazy because they're arguing for the top earners really putting their stake in the ground on top earners and when it comes to working class and poor tax cuts are a bad thing. >> the payroll tax cut there's a division between democrats about how much you want to raid the social security trust fund. but unemployment insurance, i think absolutely has to be part of the deal from the white house perspective aside from it fitting the democrat ex-ideology, it's also what president obama believes is a stimulus to the economy. >> yeah. >> that helps people have disposable income to go to restaurants, buy gas, buy food, to pay things for their children. and i would be very surprised if it ended up as p
. that's the whole issue here. >> on the fiscal cliff front, no new deals or concessions made public, but "the new york times" reports the dynamic has changed. at the request of speaker boehner, senate leaders and nancy pelosi have been dismissed from the negotiating table. leaving just the speaker and the president to hammer this one out. today vice president biden is hosting middle-class families at the white house, continuing to pressure congress to strike a deal on tax rates below 250,000. yesterday, the president struck a hopeful note with a middle-income family in virginia, while maintaining a hardline on negotiations. >> the message that i think we all want to send to members of congress is, this is a sovble problem. i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for rate at the top 2% but i remain optimistic we can get something done for that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> but the clock is ticking. with just two full weeks before christmas to go. joining me now from washington, the man with
need to seize the moment. shoo assume aing deal is reached on the fiscal cliff/curve, all eye wills turn to the next big ticket on obama's agenda -- immigration reform. starting in january the l.a. times reports the white house will begin an all-out drive for an immigration bill that will include a path to citizenship for the 11.1 million illegal immigrants currently in the country. the bill would also seek stronger border security measures, penalties for employers who hire illegal immigrants and would make it easier to bring in skilled foreign workers under special visas. in the interests of basic self-preservation, many republicans are also clambering for reform following their drubbing in the recent election when mitt's self-deportation policy lost the latino vote by a whopping 44 points. quote "there is a growing sense that this is an opportunity that should be taken, said ed jill esspi, a former republican national can i chairman. "there's no instinct like a survival instinct." for those thinking immigration reform will be a bipartisan community effort, think again. while many
negotiations over the debt ceiling fell apart. to understand what's going on during the hopeless fiscal cliff negotiations rewind to 2011 when boehner and president obama came within inches of a grand bargain, a deal that would have forced both democrats and republicans to eat their vegetables. in its comprehensive analysis of what happens during the secret negotiations, matt bai wrote -- the deal unraveled in large part because speaker boehner could not get his unruly caucus to go along with raising new revenue. fast forward to this year and republicans now think that deal, the one they walked away from, sounds pretty good. they're using it as a basis for their current proposal. only problem. boehner had his chance. president obama now thinks he has the upper hand. according to the "washington post's" ezra klein, quote -- >> joining us now representative chris van hollen of maryland, ranking member of the house budget committee. great to have you on the program. >> great to be with you, alex. >> let's talk a little bit about 2011 versus 2012, which is to say, the republican party is a very d
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)